4th & 5th Graders Learn About Zero Waste

Fourth and fifth grade students learned about zero waste lifestyles- ways of living that use no plastic or packaging that can’t be composted. Afterwards students walked around campus to see our schools compost pile and picked up trash along the road in front of school and on campus. They filled three grocery bags and the kids were so proud to help our environment.

3rd Grade Science — Becoming Soil Experts

Third graders became soil scientists by observing and testing different soil samples around the school campus. Students noted color, texture, and infiltration. They did a simple soil test to determine the main rock particles of each sample. After moistened, if the soil would not make a ball we knew the main component was sand. If it formed a crumbly ball the main component was silt. A sticky ball that could form into a worm was mostly clay. Students also noticed if there was a high or low amount of organic matter present. Students identified organic matter in the garden soil and noticed it made the soil darker in color.

5th Grade Science — Plant & Animal Cells

Fifth grade students learned about plant and animal cells. At the same time, they learned about microscopes so that they understood the difference in magnification between magnifying glasses and  different microscopes. They were so enthralled with the activity and loved looking at different things under the microscope with varying magnification.

5th Grade Social Studies — Civil War

Fifth grade students at The Learning Center Charter School completed their studies of the Civil War on April 26th but students didn’t want the unit to end.

Jay Ward, fifth grade teacher, developed a multi-layered social studies simulation that required students to imagine they were a soldier who just volunteered for the Civil War. The class was divided into Union and Confederate soldiers and grouped to represent different state infantries.

“Once students were assigned their regiments, they had to research what battle flags looked like and replicate one for their regiment flag,” said Ward.   “Students then marched around campus with their battle flags and we recreated the Battle of Oak Grove.”

To simulate the Battle of Oak Grove, students rolled dice to determine if they fired their weapons, were injured or deserted. They would roll again and use an injury table created for the simulation to determine what injuries they sustained, if they were healed, died, received amputations or were sent home due to injuries.

Recreating the battle took several class days.  Every day after the simulation, the students had to write letters home as a soldier and explain circumstances, outcomes and daily struggles they faced on the front lines of the Civil War.

“My students were so engaged in this learning process and figuring out exactly what it was like to be part of the Civil War,” said Ward.  “This project really allowed us to explore the subject on a deep level.”

5th Grade Science – Heredity

Fifth graders learned all about heredity in science and created “alien babies” using Punnett squares and figuring out dominate and recessive traits. The students were so involved in the activity they wanted to see what other types of species they could create like a mad scientist!

A Punnett square is a graphical representation of the possible genotypes of an offspring arising from a particular cross or breeding event.

Spring Musical – Aesop’s Musical Foibles

The annual spring drama production showed May 3-5, 2019 to sold out crowds in the school’s Black Box Theater.

The musical began as young Aesop explains to the audience about his problem of constantly hearing annoying voices in his head, which come to life as hysterical characters onstage that only Aesop (and the audience) can see and hear. With the resentful Fox, the egomaniac Hare, the sluggish Tortoise, the zen-like Grasshopper and many more, Aesop’s Musical Foibles retold the fables like you’ve never quite heard them before!

It was a rousing comedy filled with talented actors perfectly cast for their parts. These students spent months learning lines, songs and dances and their hard work paid off in the incredible final production!

4th Grade Learns to Clog as Part of Social Studies Focus on North Carolina

Students in fourth grade across the state have a special emphasis on North Carolina history as part of their social studies curriculum. This year our Fourth Graders learned to clog as part of this emphasis.

Clogging is an American dance form that began in the Appalachian Mountains and now enjoys widespread popularity throughout the United States and around the world.

The students performed a clogging dance to the song “Cotton Eyed Joe” at the annual talent show on April 4th. They did a fantastic job too!