AIG Wraps Up for Year

The AIG Makers After School Program is a place for academically and intellectually gifted (AIG) students to receive enriched educational offerings.  This year these students worked on long term projects with guidance from teachers and community members and presented them at the annual School Maker Faire back in March.

To celebrate the great success of their Maker projects, the group wrapped up their year with a party where they dyed hard boiled eggs.

Dome Theater Recap

The Dome Theater visited our campus on March 6, 2018. The Dome Theater is much more than a traveling planetarium. Developed by Rice University, the Houston Museum of Natural Science, and supported by NASA, the Dome Theater is 16ft x 16ft wide and reaches 10ft tall.

Traveling all over the nation, this interactive giant features highly innovative, educational and entertaining programs.

All students viewed hour long educational Dome Theater programming during the school day.

Students and staff enjoyed having the Dome Theater on campus!

Thank you to PI (Parents Involved) for making this event possible.

 

3rd Annual SCHOOL MAKER FAIRE Revisited

The Learning Center Charter School celebrated making of all kinds at our 3rd annual School Maker Faire on Thursday, March 15 from 3:30 – 7:30. Imagine a science fair, craft show, tech conference, and county fair, all rolled into one and you can picture a School Maker Faire.

Makers – from Learning Center students to community members – had booths featuring their own unique Maker project. There were hands-on activities, demonstrations, delicious homemade food and live music.

A special thank you to our wonderful community of Makers that made this event possible. The School Maker Faire proved to be an inspiring and educational evening for everyone who attended.

Students Venture to Franklin, NC to Smoky Mountain Center for the Performing Arts

In early March, students in kindergarten through second grade ventured out to Franklin, NC to see James and the Giant Peach at Smoky Mountain Center for the Performing Arts.

Presented by the Overlook Theatre Company, James and the Giant Peach tells the story of James, a lonely, orphaned boy living with his two horrible and nasty aunts in a ramshackle house on the top of a high hill in the south of England. His aunts make James do all the cleaning and never let him away from the house to meet other children or make friends. But James’ luck starts to change when he meets a mysterious old man who hands him a magical gift. That gift will change his life and introduce James to some of the most unusual friends a young boy could ever have, leading to the most fantastical adventure one could only imagine! Told through the magic puppetry, eye-popping special effects and filled with lots of laughs, this classic story based on the work of Roald Dahl, will delight every dreamer of every age.

National School Breakfast Week & Celebrating Dr. Seuss

Studies indicate that students who eat breakfast increase their math and reading scores and improve their cognitive speed and memory, according to the Food Research and Action Center.  Students who are “fueled up” with a nutritious meal increase the chances that their mental and physical stamina is up to par for a great day at school.

 

The Learning Center Charter School celebrated National School Breakfast Week March 5th-9th both as a means to recognize the importance of this meal and to increase awareness of the school’s Early Bird Breakfast Club.

The Learning Center’s Early Bird Breakfast Club begins at 7:15am daily. The nutrition staff offers up both hot and cold breakfast options as well as cereal, fruit, yogurt and milk. The program was the first in the state to win the Breakfast Champion Award in 2012.  Additionally, the program has received two grants – one from No Kid Hungry North Carolina/Share Our Strength, and another from Action for Healthy Kids School Grants for Healthy Kids.

 

As part of the week long breakfast celebration, the school marked the birthday of literary giant, Dr. Seuss. Kitchen staff wore Seuss costumes, the Dining Commons was decked out in Seuss colors and decorations and students were served green eggs and ham.

School Child Nutrition Director, Hilary Dixson, said, “Offering well prepared, healthy food that nourishes our young learners is a cornerstone of our educational environment. National School Breakfast Week was a way to teach the importance of eating a nutritious breakfast and the silly costumes and green eggs and ham made it fun and memorable for our students.”

6th Grade Adopts Endangered Species as Part of PBL Project

Sixth grade students at The Learning Center Charter School adopted not one, but two endangered species as part of a broader Project Based Learning (PBL) project in science class.

PBL projects are part of the regular approach to learning at the charter school.  PBL is a teaching method in which students gain knowledge and skills by working for an extended period of time to investigate and respond to authentic, complex questions, problems or challenges.

In this instance, students tackled not only learning about specific animal species and all the science related to that task, but also the ecological, environmental, economic and social circumstances that are threatening the existence of the species.  They gained insight and understanding of the fact that it is not as easy as it may seem to change the factors threatening animals.

These students learned about and found ways to help endangered species across the globe.  They researched various animals, narrowed down their choices, and came up with ideas to raise money to help their selected species. The students finalized their plans and raised enough money to symbolically adopt both a polar bear and a Sumatran rhinoceros.

Jessie Karagenes, sixth grade science teacher at the school, said, “These students have diligently worked through the standards in this science unit.”  Karagenes went on to explain that the connections these students made to one of several 21st century skills that the school stresses, thinking globally, made this project even more impactful for the class.

 

Art and Social Studies Collaboration in Kindergarten

Recently, kindergarten students spent time making art as part of their social studies lesson on Africa. Working across the subjects in this manner develops a deeper and wider understanding of the subject at hand. The students loved learning about the geography, animals, food and culture found in Africa.