Students LEAP After School at TLC

Students at The Learning Center Charter School have the option to be part of the school’s daily after school program called LEAP.

LEAP stands for Learning, Education, Activity, and Program and is offered each day from 12:30 until 3:30. State Covid-19 restrictions prevent any afterschool program extending beyond the 3:30 normal end of school day time period.

Cheryl Catuto, LEAP coordinator, said that program is designed to assist working families and offer a meaningful addition to the regular school day.

The program offers free breakfast and lunch, monitored remote learning time with computer access, recess, outdoor play and education, class work project time, STEM activities, arts and crafts, story time and silent reading time.

“Staff members safely monitor and engage students throughout the day in a fun and enriching environment,” said Catuto.   She added that in addition to the quality activities, all sanitation and safety procedures are adhered to during LEAP.

To learn more about The Learning Center Charter School visit, www.naturallygrownkids.org or call (828)835-7240.

Preschool on our Campus

21st Century Education at its best is our guarantee to your student when you join the Community of Learners at TLC Preschool, a feeder program to The Learning Center Charter School, K-8th grade program.

Our preschool has been in operation since 1983. Over the years, we continue to learn, continue to watch and revamp our program as needed to assure that our youngest learners are starting their educational lives in an exciting, engaging, and individualized way. 

We believe that the high academic achievement that accompanies early education is merely a by-product of learning with joy. To accomplish this, our Preschool students are included in the same E-STEAM culture as their K-8 peers, creating a solid foundation for a lifetime of learning. 

And, our teachers are ready rain or shine!

The Learning Center Earns OWL Academy Distinction

The Learning Center Charter School has earned the distinction of being an Open Way Learning (OWL) Academy as of September 15, 2020.

OWL is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization with the singular mission to help schools develop, sustain, and grow cultures of innovation that better prepares students for our modern world and workforce.  According to openwaylearning.org, OWL is a framework that encourages educators to create, modify, and share best practices to help education keep pace with a rapidly changing economy, society, and environment.

The OWL Academy designation was granted by the OWL Board of Directors as a way to highlight schools that have demonstrated a commitment to authentic innovation. Specifically, the designation is only extended to schools that have shown dedication toward building a culture of innovation through the principles of Open Way Learning: living mission, collective leadership, systemic collaboration, open sharing, and a willingness to adopt and sustain innovative teaching and learning practices.

Head of school, Ryan Bender, is proud of the OWL Academy designation and said, “Engaging in shared vision, collaboration, and the free exchange of ideas ensures that our school will continue to create customized solutions for our students and community.

“We were able to continue the work on becoming an OWL Academy school despite the challenges that Covid-19 has presented and I think that the OWL Board of Directors recognized that as clear evidence of our true commitment to an innovation culture,” added Bender.

Art Still Part of Curriculum Despite Covid-19

Students at The Learning Center Charter School are either attending school in a hybrid model or fully remote, depending on student choice. However, despite this unique scheduling due to the global pandemic, all students at the school are still receiving visual arts and music education weekly.

The charter school embraces learning through the arts as an essential part of their E-STEAM curriculum. E-STEAM stands for entrepreneurship, science, technology, engineering, arts & agriculture, and math. The arts component is evident on the campus grounds that showcases art projects from across the grade levels and subject areas.

Despite the challenges due to Covid-19 for teachers and students as opposed to a “normal” school year model, the school has found a way to still provide art education to all of students. Art teacher, Kelly Denton, has created both independent art and music websites that guide students through art and music lessons. The art website even acts as a showcase for student art upon submission to Denton.

“I’ve managed to map out the entire school year with both music and visual art lessons,” said Denton. Students will study things like rhythm, tempo, pitch and different music styles. Art lessons include things like shapes, positive and negative space, color theory, as well as focus on different famous artists throughout the school year. 

“School has to be more than sitting at a computer clicking through options. I want our kids to have fun and learning things they can use to express themselves. What the students have been producing is phenomenal. They inspire me,” said Denton.