Education in the US

We are lucky to have quality education available to us at The Learning Center! Charter School. Not everyone is so fortunate. Though it is not an issue in our community, it is an issue for our country. And we must join the conversation . . . and the solution.

Join the movement. Click here.

 

The Learning Center! Charter School’s sole intent is to provide our  school community with information about what is happening politically in  our state regarding charter school law.  We solely seek to inform.

Farm to Fork

Learn about the  NC 10% campaign and pledge to spend 10% or more of your food dollars locally.  This is an initiative of the Center for Environmental Farming Systems and is supported locally by SAFF (Southern Appalachian Family Farms) and Cherokee County Cooperative Extension Office.  The website contains good information about seasonal availability and links to a wealth of food-related information.

Click HERE to find out how it works and to sign up!

You can even follow them on Facebook HERE.

Visitors on campus

TLC! was happy to host North Carolina Senator John Snow and House Representative Roger West on our campus Friday, September 17, 2010.   Senate hopeful Jim Davis visited the day before.

These state legislators were invited to tour our school and be reminded of all the great things we are doing for our students and our community.  Mary Jo Dyre, Karen Brinke and myself presented numbers and successes to the candidates and communicated the value of choice in education.  We also clearly relayed our hopes for positive legislation concerning charter schools.

It was a pleasure to have each of them visit.

Kindergarten meets Johnny Appleseed

Apples and fall go hand-in-hand.  What could be better than learning about both out in the field?

Our brand new kindergarten class got to do just that when they visited the Georgia Mountain Research and Education Center last week.  They learned about apples, where they come from,  played games and got to meet Johnny Appleseed himself.

Little do those cuties know how much apples will become part of how they learn math, reading and writing in the weeks to come.

Did you hear about the salad bar?

Recently I sat down with Ms. Debby to talk about the new salad bar option in our Dining Commons.  This is what she had to say . . .

Normally I wouldn’t declare any new program a “success” so early in the year, but the response to our new daily salad bar has been so positive I think it is safe to say that it is a real hit.

Our salad bar includes lettuce (romaine at present, but it varies with the season and availability), various freshly prepared vegetables,  a variety of protein sources such as cheese, chopped eggs, meats and beans,  wheat crackers, croutons and several choices of individually portioned dressings. Students choosing the salad bar option also receive  milk and fruit qualifying this as a complete meal for everyone whether or not the student qualifies for free or reduced meals.

The salad bar is available as a choice to students in grades 4-8.  We have been delighted and a little bit surprised that so far more of these students are choosing the salad bar option than the hot option.

With our younger students we offer salad a little differently.  Their hot meals are plated and served at their assigned tables.  Tossed salad with dressing is available to them as an “extra” each day that the salad bar is offered to the upper grades.  Our hope is that by making salad available to them daily, these younger ones will learn to consider greens an enjoyable part of a good meal.

Thanks Ms. Debby.   You’ve got the best lunch in town!

What exactly is a charter school anyway?

How many of you have been at a summer cookout and have been asked, “I know your kid goes to the charter school over there down from the pool.  What exactly is a charter school anyway?”  How about at Thanksgiving dinner when all your distant relatives are together?  Doesn’t someone invariably ask you to tell them what makes a charter school different from other schools?  I’ve even been asked by the check-out person at the grocery store when they see my kid’s school t-shirt.

So, what do you tell them?

Wikipedia says that,

a charter school is a school that receives public money (and like other schools, may also receive private donations) but are not subject to some of the rules, regulations, and statutes that apply to other public schools in exchange for some type of accountability for producing certain results, which are set forth in each school’s charter.  Charter schools are opened and attended by choice.  While charter schools provide an alternative to other public schools, they are part of the public education system and are not allowed to charge tuition.

Alright.

Um.  Well.  Okay.

What are you going to tell Great Uncle Earl when he asks what a charter school is at your next holiday get together?

A charter school is a public school of choice. It is public.  Public means no tuition.  In other words, it’s free.  And, you choose to go there.

A charter school offers innovation in education. A charter school has to meet the same state academic standards that every other school has to meet.  However, the school itself decides how it’s going to achieve those standards.

Now you know.

So go forth and educate the world.  Or at least your immediate community.

1st day

Students arriving early.  Parents in tow.   Bags of supplies.  Smiling teachers.  Nervous kindergartners.  Traffic directors.  Breakfast eaters.  Board members.  Volunteers.  Running down boardwalks.  Being reminded to walk.  “How was your summer’s.”  Welcoming back.  Where do I go?  Who will I know?  Hey!  I know you! Lunch time at last.  Where is my backpack?  Now where do I go?  Parent meeting.  Made a new friend.  Cars here for pickup.  Final bell rings.

Here goes 2010-2011.