Third Graders Study Lost Cities as Part of Remote Learning

As soon as stay-at-home orders switched daily school to remote education from home, Kathleen Shook, third grade teacher at The Learning Center Charter School, immediately switched gears on how to continue enriching E-STEAM and PBL projects for her remote class.  As a result, students embarked on an extensive project based on lost cities of the world.

A targeted E-STEAM education approach ensures students engage in science, technology, engineering and math regularly. PBL is a teaching method in which students gain knowledge and skills by working for an extended period of time to investigate and respond to an authentic, complex question, problem, or challenge.

The premise of the lost cities project came from a book the class read together about cities in history that are no longer inhabited either by means of disappearance, natural disaster, or mysterious episode.  Students researched lost cities and chose ones to focus on depending on their interests.  Petra, Atlantis and Great Zimbabwe were popular choices.

At the conclusion of the project, students designed and built models of their chosen lost city.  Many used recycled materials while others used both technology and materials found in nature to build outside forts.

“Not being able to be in the same room with my students is challenging to be able to gauge how my students are delving into a subject,” said Shook.  “However, I know from experience that PBL projects like this harness student curiosity and allow a deeper exploration and understanding of studies.”

The lost cities project included science, reading, writing and social studies components.

“What we could have learned about lost cities in one lesson on one day is nothing compared to the deeply engaged learning that we participated in during our PBL unit with lost cities as our overall theme,” said Shook.

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Weekly Art at TLC

Students in kindergarten through third grade have art each Friday. As part of their class studies, students learn about color theory, values, famous artists, art styles, art mediums and techniques, and art for art’s sake. On this particular day of art, Ms. Kelly read the poem “Hope is the Thing with Feathers“ by Emily Dickinson.

Students loved the poem and had wildly different reactions to it. Some believed the poem was about God and tried to create their own image of God. Some saw the poem as being about angels. Some saw birds in their minds and created actual flying things to represent the hope that is flying. Some had much more abstract concepts in their art. Some created images of their family with wings, since their family represents hope to them. In one piece of art, it was snowing feathers over the whole world.

Kindergarten Makers

Making is part of everything we do at The Learning Center Charter School. Over the past several weeks, all sorts of Maker projects from our 5th Annual School Maker Faire have been highlighted.

Every students from kindergarten through eighth grade participated in the School Maker Faire which is why the event has proven to be such a success and long anticipated event each school year.

Thank you for supporting your students and encouraging their making!

1st Grade Explores Dyeing Fabrics

As part of an ongoing exploration of science in first grade, students experimented with dyeing different types of fibers with both artificial and natural dyes.

They dyed wool fiber and cotton string and were very surprised by some of the results. They hypothisized that the Kool-Aid dye would result in brighter colors than it actual did. They also thought that the purple cabbage would result in a similar purple dye when, in fact, it did not.

All of their findings were on display in the classroom at our annual School Maker Faire in March.

1st & 2nd Grade Language Arts & School Maker Faire Project

First and second grade students worked collaboratively on a project that was displayed at our annual School Maker Faire in March. After reading “Charlie Needs A Cloak” by Tomie dePaola, students made sculptures from recycled objects.

Want to know more about the story? Watch this video.

4th Grade Makes Famous People for School Maker Faire

Fourth grade students had an incredible display of the famous people in history sculptures that they made at our annual School Maker Faire in March.

Students researched famous people in history and then recreated them as seen here. The photos do not do them justice. They were incredible to see in person.

These sculptures, of course, allowed the students to experiment with a new form of art but also required them to delve into history, sharpen their research skills, practice their writing skills in a written report, and dive deep into their studies.