Learning More About Us & What the New School Year Will Look Like

School starts in less than a month and we appreciate Cherokee County Chamber of Commerce visiting our school, learning more about us, and making this video.

The 2020-21 school year is definitely going to look different for our students but The Learning Center has solid plans in place to offer our families two options for how students can be enrolled, attend school, and receive the awesome E-STEAM, Project Based Learning (PBL), Open Way Learning (OWL) education you expect and rely on.

Visit our website’s FAQ of our Covid-19 2020-21 School Year page to find the latest, up-to-date information about how school will look this fall at The Learning Center Charter School.

3rd Graders Studied Famous Statues

This statue was titled, “Stay Safe, Stay Home”

During remote learning this past school year, third grade students were assigned the task of researching some famous statues across the world, like the Statue of Liberty, Christ the Redeemer, and The Motherland Calls. They were asked to create their own statues to represent the Covid-19 Crisis and Quarantine. These students totally knocked it out of the park!

This student described his statute by saying, “I don’t like staying at home all the time and I don’t like wearing a mask. My statue is six feet tall because you are supposed to stay six feet away from people. The laptop is for remote learning because we can’t go to school. The gloves and mask and antibacterial soap are to keep people safe from getting the virus. The solar light is for essential workers and teachers for helping.”
This student explained, “I chose the apple because it’s a symbol for health and I chose the golf tees because it is a symbol for fun and social activities which have been really limited by Covid 19.  I had it floating in the air because everything is so uncertain right now.”  

Virtual Community Partnerships During Remote Learning

As a parent or guardian, you know how teachers interacted with your students during the stay-at-home, remote learning mandated by the state in response to the global pandemic. Many of our students participated in regular class meetings via Zoom.

Often times, third graders ended their class Zoom meetings by participating in the virtual Lego Club challenges presented by the Murphy Public Library.

Virtual community partnerships at it’s finest!

Third Graders Study Lost Cities as Part of Remote Learning

As soon as stay-at-home orders switched daily school to remote education from home, Kathleen Shook, third grade teacher at The Learning Center Charter School, immediately switched gears on how to continue enriching E-STEAM and PBL projects for her remote class.  As a result, students embarked on an extensive project based on lost cities of the world.

A targeted E-STEAM education approach ensures students engage in science, technology, engineering and math regularly. PBL is a teaching method in which students gain knowledge and skills by working for an extended period of time to investigate and respond to an authentic, complex question, problem, or challenge.

The premise of the lost cities project came from a book the class read together about cities in history that are no longer inhabited either by means of disappearance, natural disaster, or mysterious episode.  Students researched lost cities and chose ones to focus on depending on their interests.  Petra, Atlantis and Great Zimbabwe were popular choices.

At the conclusion of the project, students designed and built models of their chosen lost city.  Many used recycled materials while others used both technology and materials found in nature to build outside forts.

“Not being able to be in the same room with my students is challenging to be able to gauge how my students are delving into a subject,” said Shook.  “However, I know from experience that PBL projects like this harness student curiosity and allow a deeper exploration and understanding of studies.”

The lost cities project included science, reading, writing and social studies components.

“What we could have learned about lost cities in one lesson on one day is nothing compared to the deeply engaged learning that we participated in during our PBL unit with lost cities as our overall theme,” said Shook.

Want to learn more about the E-STEAM and PBL approach at The Learning Center Charter School? Fill out the form below and we will contact you.

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2nd Grade Studies Butterfly Life Cycle During Remote Learning

As part of remote learning for second graders, students have studied the life cycle of a butterfly. The studies included texts, interactive videos, reading aloud, directed drawing, and digital art. This allowed students to learn science, reading and writing standards!

Additionally, Ms. Stephanie also was able to share the process with her students via photos and video chats of the Painted Lady butterflies that she documented throughout the life cycle process.

“Makers Challenges” During Remote Learning

Charter school continues “Maker Challenges” during remote learning

The Learning Center Charter School has a history of STEM education and cultivating a “maker” environment on campus. In fact, back in March before stay-at-home orders were issued for the state, the school hosted its fifth annual School Maker Faire.

A School Maker Faire is a celebration of invention, creativity, and resourcefulness. It’s a place to show what you’ve made and to share what you’ve learned with others.  Schools host Maker Faires because they are a perfect combination of part science fair, part county fair, and part something entirely new. School Maker Faire exhibitors, or “makers,” are primarily students—either as individuals, clubs, classes or groups. And Maker Faire exhibits can be from any discipline — from science to art to gardening to engineering to craft.

Despite students being at home and completing the school year remotely, Head of School, Ryan Bender, has been sure to continue encouraging the maker spirit among students.

Each school day, Bender posts video morning announcements on the school’s Facebook page.  On Mondays his announcements include the week’s “Makers Challenge” along with inspiration and encouragement on how to participate and share what students make.

“Students have made everything from catapults to animal habitats and innovative footwear as part of the Maker Challenges since remote learning began,” said Bender.

Bender added that parents have communicated their appreciation for the Maker Challenges as a means to keep their students engaged in their remote studies and excited about each school week.

Want to learn more about The Learning Center? We are currently enrolling for the 2020-21 school year. Fill out this form and we will contact you soon.

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Underground Railroad Quilt Project

Middle school social studies students read about the Underground Railroad and the quilt codes used during the early to mid-19th century.  The Underground Railroad was used by enslaved African-Americans to escape into free states and Canada. The scheme was assisted by abolitionists and others sympathetic to the cause of the escaping slaves.

Students were tasked with making a paper quilt and then describe the “message” that was being conveyed.  Each quilt block sent a specific message. The blocks in the photograph above conveyed the following message: The “Monkey Wrench” turns the “Wagon Wheel” at “9:00 o’clock” following the “North Star” to the “Log Cabin” for some “Bow Ties”. Bow ties represented getting a change of clothes.

Cleaning Angels

You’ve heard of “Charlie’s Angels” right? Well, meet the TLC’s Angels! Not only is this crew cleaning the school meticulously, but they are also calling families to see if they need food support.  #TLCStrongerTogether

We invite you to use the hashtag #TLCStrongerTogether on social media to proudly showcase how we are, each of us, stronger together as a TLC family during this time.

PBL Math – Geometic 3D Shapes During Remote Learning

Sixth grade students were tasked with creating 3D spaceships using geometric shapes as part of a larger PBL (Project Based Learning) project during the last several weeks of remote learning. Students had to research spaceships in order to be able to create an accurate model. Additionally, they had to find the area, perimeter, and surface area of each shape on their spaceship.