Art Still Part of Curriculum Despite Covid-19

Students at The Learning Center Charter School are either attending school in a hybrid model or fully remote, depending on student choice. However, despite this unique scheduling due to the global pandemic, all students at the school are still receiving visual arts and music education weekly.

The charter school embraces learning through the arts as an essential part of their E-STEAM curriculum. E-STEAM stands for entrepreneurship, science, technology, engineering, arts & agriculture, and math. The arts component is evident on the campus grounds that showcases art projects from across the grade levels and subject areas.

Despite the challenges due to Covid-19 for teachers and students as opposed to a “normal” school year model, the school has found a way to still provide art education to all of students. Art teacher, Kelly Denton, has created both independent art and music websites that guide students through art and music lessons. The art website even acts as a showcase for student art upon submission to Denton.

“I’ve managed to map out the entire school year with both music and visual art lessons,” said Denton. Students will study things like rhythm, tempo, pitch and different music styles. Art lessons include things like shapes, positive and negative space, color theory, as well as focus on different famous artists throughout the school year. 

“School has to be more than sitting at a computer clicking through options. I want our kids to have fun and learning things they can use to express themselves. What the students have been producing is phenomenal. They inspire me,” said Denton.

1st Grade Science – All Living Things Video from Ms. Emily

Ms. Emily teaches science to our young students. Here she is teaching about living things.

As a family member or friend of a student at our school, you may wonder how education is being delivered remotely on the days that your student is not on campus. Our teachers are using many methods including videos. This is just one example! Here, Ms. Emily does a short ten minute lesson for first graders on living things as part of science.

Art for All Kindergarten through 8th Grade Students

You already know that The Learning Center Charter School values art in all forms as an important component education. We have always offered chorus, visual arts, and dramatic arts opportunities to our students. This year, as we operate A & B schedules as well as a fully remote option, we still have art!

Ms. Kelly is providing virtual art lessons for all Kindergarten through eighth grade students.

These photos are examples of the first lesson for the school year which taught how fun it it to use lines. Ms. Kelly asked students to create a scribble and fill it in with colored lines in any patters they liked. This introductory lesson allowed students an easy way to use lines at home with any medium they had available!

Freckle New at TLC this School Year

Whether your family has opted for in-person hybrid learning or fully remote learning, we are meeting students exactly where they are academically. Beginning this school year, we are using the online platform called Freckle, that provides differentiated learning.

Freckle continuously adapts to each student’s individual skills and provides inquiry based lessons. It also provides teachers with individual student data which helps to better differential for each child.

Learning More About Us & What the New School Year Will Look Like

School starts in less than a month and we appreciate Cherokee County Chamber of Commerce visiting our school, learning more about us, and making this video.

The 2020-21 school year is definitely going to look different for our students but The Learning Center has solid plans in place to offer our families two options for how students can be enrolled, attend school, and receive the awesome E-STEAM, Project Based Learning (PBL), Open Way Learning (OWL) education you expect and rely on.

Visit our website’s FAQ of our Covid-19 2020-21 School Year page to find the latest, up-to-date information about how school will look this fall at The Learning Center Charter School.

3rd Graders Studied Famous Statues

This statue was titled, “Stay Safe, Stay Home”

During remote learning this past school year, third grade students were assigned the task of researching some famous statues across the world, like the Statue of Liberty, Christ the Redeemer, and The Motherland Calls. They were asked to create their own statues to represent the Covid-19 Crisis and Quarantine. These students totally knocked it out of the park!

This student described his statute by saying, “I don’t like staying at home all the time and I don’t like wearing a mask. My statue is six feet tall because you are supposed to stay six feet away from people. The laptop is for remote learning because we can’t go to school. The gloves and mask and antibacterial soap are to keep people safe from getting the virus. The solar light is for essential workers and teachers for helping.”
This student explained, “I chose the apple because it’s a symbol for health and I chose the golf tees because it is a symbol for fun and social activities which have been really limited by Covid 19.  I had it floating in the air because everything is so uncertain right now.”  

Virtual Community Partnerships During Remote Learning

As a parent or guardian, you know how teachers interacted with your students during the stay-at-home, remote learning mandated by the state in response to the global pandemic. Many of our students participated in regular class meetings via Zoom.

Often times, third graders ended their class Zoom meetings by participating in the virtual Lego Club challenges presented by the Murphy Public Library.

Virtual community partnerships at it’s finest!

Third Graders Study Lost Cities as Part of Remote Learning

As soon as stay-at-home orders switched daily school to remote education from home, Kathleen Shook, third grade teacher at The Learning Center Charter School, immediately switched gears on how to continue enriching E-STEAM and PBL projects for her remote class.  As a result, students embarked on an extensive project based on lost cities of the world.

A targeted E-STEAM education approach ensures students engage in science, technology, engineering and math regularly. PBL is a teaching method in which students gain knowledge and skills by working for an extended period of time to investigate and respond to an authentic, complex question, problem, or challenge.

The premise of the lost cities project came from a book the class read together about cities in history that are no longer inhabited either by means of disappearance, natural disaster, or mysterious episode.  Students researched lost cities and chose ones to focus on depending on their interests.  Petra, Atlantis and Great Zimbabwe were popular choices.

At the conclusion of the project, students designed and built models of their chosen lost city.  Many used recycled materials while others used both technology and materials found in nature to build outside forts.

“Not being able to be in the same room with my students is challenging to be able to gauge how my students are delving into a subject,” said Shook.  “However, I know from experience that PBL projects like this harness student curiosity and allow a deeper exploration and understanding of studies.”

The lost cities project included science, reading, writing and social studies components.

“What we could have learned about lost cities in one lesson on one day is nothing compared to the deeply engaged learning that we participated in during our PBL unit with lost cities as our overall theme,” said Shook.

Want to learn more about the E-STEAM and PBL approach at The Learning Center Charter School? Fill out the form below and we will contact you.

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