National School Choice Week

We proudly join over 2.9 million charter school students nationwide in support of National School Choice Week.

Held every January, National School Choice Week focuses on increasing public awareness and empowering parents with the freedom to choose the best educational environments for their children. These options include traditional public schools, public charter schools, magnet schools, online learning, private schools, and homeschooling.

School choice is the movement that offers charter schools as a viable option in education. We are a North Carolina Public School Choice opportunity for education and parents who are seeking a choice for their students’ academic needs have said YES to choosing our school.

Thank YOU for choosing The Learning Center Charter School for your students!

Head of School Becomes HundrED Ambassador

In the two years that Ryan Bender has been Head of School at The Learning Center Charter School, he has been committed to innovative education and weaving it into all that he does at the school. 

Under Bender’s leadership, the school became a certified Open Way Learning (OWL) Academy in September 2020.  OWL is a nonprofit organization with the singular mission to help schools develop, sustain, and grow cultures of innovation that better prepares students for our modern world and workforce.  According to openwaylearning.org, OWL is a framework that encourages educators to create, modify, and share best practices to help education keep pace with a rapidly changing economy, society, and environment.

Bender was introduced to the HundrED movement through the OWL Academy connection. HundrED is a global education nonprofit organization which seeks and shares inspiring innovation in primary and secondary education.  

“I was accepted as a HundrED ambassador and this distinction connects our school to resources and innovative education happening across the globe,” said Bender.  “This benefits our school by linking resources for Professional Development for teachers as well as more educational resources for our students.”

“The voluntary HundrED community comprises over 600+ teachers, school principals, education consultants, professors, parents, and students from over 90 countries,” said Bender.  “This network of educators helps identify what works in schools and collaborate to drive change on the local level.”

Bender added that the HundrED program is in line with the school’s OWL philosophy of free and open-source access.  “Engaging in shared vision, collaboration, and the free exchange of ideas ensures that our school will continue to create customized solutions for our students and community,” said Bender.

Students Make Wind Vanes to Learn Weather

[As seen in the Cherokee Scout.]

Second grade students at The Learning Center Charter School learned about weather by immersing themselves in a hands-on E-STEAM activity designing and making anemometers.

E-STEAM stands for entrepreneurship, science, technology, engineering, arts and agriculture, and math and is a guiding educational philosophy at the charter school. An anemometer is an instrument for measuring the speed of the wind.

Second graders at the school studied weather patterns, climate, and seasons as well as weather instruments used to measure properties of weather.

“Weather is an important science standard for second graders in North Carolina,” said Emily Willey, elementary science teacher at the school.  “Designing and building our own tools for measuring wind speed engaged students deeply in the weather study and had students excited to learn more.”

Willey added that students also made windsocks to measure the direction of the wind and used thermometers to accurately measure temperature.  Students also learned about barometers, Doppler radar satellites, and weather balloons as important tools to predict weather patterns.

K-2 Students Celebrate Native American Heritage Month

Teamwork and collaboration were at its best among the primary classes at The Learning Center Charter School as students in kindergarten through second grade celebrated Native American Heritage Month in November.

Each grade level represented a different Native American Tribe across the nation and studied their tribe in-depth.  The unit ended with a pow-wow among all the grades.  

Kindergarten represented the Woodland tribe of the Wampanoag. The Wampanoag was the first tribe to meet the Pilgrims. Kindergarten students learned the Wampanoag taught the pilgrims how to survive in their new land and they were also the tribe that celebrated the first Thanksgiving.

First Grade students represented the Southeast region as the Cherokee tribe.  They learned the Cherokee language and writing system was invented by Sequoyah, a famous Cherokee. First Graders also learned how the Cherokee used natural resources to make their homes, canoes, jewelry, and clothing.

Second grade students represented the Plains as the Lakota Sioux. Students learned how the Lakota were nomads and buffalo hunters who traveled around the Great Plains. They also learned the Lakota were great warriors, like Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse who defeated Colonel Custer in the Battle of Little Big- Horn famously known as ‘Custer’s Last Stand’.

As part of the culminating pow-wow, students created Native American costumes, jewelry, and instruments. Students paraded around the campus to authentic Native American music.  At the pow-wow each class shared with the others facts about the tribe they represented. The students were even able to sample cornbread made by the hands of the Wampanoag (kindergarten). The Cherokee (first grade) shared Tuya Gadu, delicious bread made with sweet potatoes, corn and sweetened with maple syrup.

First Graders Use Nature and E-STEAM to Celebrate Holidays

First grade students at The Learning Center Charter School used nature, reading lessons, and E-STEAM to make holiday ornaments as part of their studies leading up to Christmas break.

E-STEAM stands for entrepreneurship, science, technology, engineering, art and agriculture, and math.

The students read books as a class and independently on winter and winter animals for days leading up to the project.  Students then collected berries, leaves, moss, and flowers from the school’s Outdoor Learning Center.  While foraging for these supplies, students learned which plants and berries stay alive during winter and what characteristics they have that allow them to do so. They also learned which animals eat berries and use moss and leaves for nests.

First grade teacher Katie Grider said, “Each school day we spend as much time as possible outside and finding ways to teach lessons and engage students in hands-on learning outside the four walls of our classroom is key to a deeper understanding of the subject matter.”

Grider added that not only does being outdoors encourage physical activity, fitness, and health, but it also provides a living laboratory for students to explore, experiment, interact and collaborate.

After collecting the items from outdoors, students made ornaments by filling cups with the items and water and allowing them to freeze. The ornaments were then hung on a tree on campus.

TLC Staff Livens Up Holidays

Both students and staff needed a moral boost before the holiday break. The unusual school year with they hybrid and fully remote models in place has been stressful on all. Teachers took it upon themselves to bring some holiday cheer and at least bring some laughter to those around by their over the top outfits!